We still know nearly nothing about synapsid integument

In 2018, I attended a talk about end-Permian ecosystem collapse by Smith et al. (2018) at that year's Society of Vertebrate Paleontology conference in Albuquerque. The presenter mentioned a mass Lystrosaurus death site from earliest Triassic South Africa. That in itself is cool, but he offhandedly mentioned some preserved some individuals with mummified skin - … Continue reading We still know nearly nothing about synapsid integument

The “molecular paleontology” list

And might as well publicize this list too while I'm at it. Preserved biomolecules in extinct taxa, such as DNA and proteins, are quite a fascinating topic. They allow scientists to place extinct taxa in molecular phylogenies, understand evolution of certain genes, and quantify prehistoric population dynamics. As well, hypothetically, sequences derived from ancient nuclear … Continue reading The “molecular paleontology” list

Pterosaurs of the Kem Kem Beds

The Kem Kem Beds lie on the border of Morocco and Algeria. This formation produces fossils that date to the Cenomanian, which reveal a coastal deltaic wetland environment. It's most famous for the various large theropod dinosaurs such as Carcharodontosaurus and Spinosaurus (leading to the infamous Stromer's Riddle - why are there so many large predatory dinosaurs in … Continue reading Pterosaurs of the Kem Kem Beds